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5 Things to Know About Stevie Tu'ikolovatu

Posted Apr 29, 2017

A few interesting facts about the Buccaneers' seventh-round draft pick.

1. He’s an older rookie.
After redshirting at Utah in 2009, Tu'ikolovatu completed a two-year mission, making him 25 at the time that the Buccaneers selected him in the seventh round of the 2017 NFL Draft. Most rookies enter the league anywhere from 21 to 23. In terms of physical development, Tu'ikolovatu is where a typical second or third-year player would be.  

2. He is a big-bodied run-stuffer.
At 6-foot-1 and 330 pounds, Tu'ikolovatu’s forte is stopping the run. He was listed on many draft sites as a nose tackle and will likely be a one technique with the Buccaneers. A one technique usually lines up on either of the center’s shoulders while a three technique, like Gerald McCoy, lines up off of the opponent’s guard.  

3. He played for two major programs in college.
Tu'ikolovatu played out an entire career at Utah, earning his degree. But he still had one year of eligibility left and chose to continue his career at USC, where he started 13 games. Tu'ikolovatu played a combined three seasons between the two programs.

4. He’s scored a touchdown.
It’s not very often a 330-pound player finds the end zone, but Tu'ikolovatu did it during the 2015 season with Utah. In a game against Fresno State, Tu'ikolovatu picked up a fumble and brought it back 35 yards for a score.

5. He’s a tough assignment.
In their scouting report, Pro Football Focus said that Tu'ikolovatu was “impossible to reach block.” They added that he “embarrassed offensive linemen by rag-dolling blockers frequently at the point of attack.”