Four Tryout Players Earn Roster Spots with Bucs

Twenty-seven players participated in the Tampa Bay Buccaneers' rookie mini-camp with no guarantee beyond the weekend. Four of them will be back on the AdventHealth Training Center practice field on Tuesday.

On Monday, the Buccaneers announced that they had signed safety D'Cota Dixon, outside linebacker David Kenney, tackle Riley Mayfield and wide receiver Spencer Schnell, all of whom had taken part in the team's weekend mini-camp on tryout contracts. To make room for those additions on the 90-man offseason roster, the Buccaneers waived tackle Israel Helms and Malik Taylor, waived/injured tight end Isaiah Searight and released running back Kerwynn Williams.

Dixon, Kenney, Mayfield and Schnell hope to follow in the footsteps of Adam Humphries and Demar Dotson, two former tryout players who developed into top performers for the Buccaneers.

Dixon (5-10, 201), who played his prep ball in New Smyrna Beach, Florida, comes to the Bucs from Wisconsin, where he appeared in 51 games with 32 starts over four seasons. In that span, Dixon amassed 177 tackles, 2.5 sacks, three forced fumbles, five interceptions and 16 passes defensed.

Kenney (6-2, 250) also had a tryout with the Indianapolis Colts before coming to Tampa. He played one season at Illinois State in 2015 after transferring from Indiana, recording 11 tackles.

Mayfield (6-7, 311) played two seasons at North Texas, starting all 27 games at right tackle during the 2017-18 campaigns. He was twice named to the Conference USA all-academic team.

Schnell (5-8, 178) played three years at Illinois State, capped by a 2018 campaign in which he was named a team captain and a first-team all-conference selection. Over those three seasons, Schnell compiled 175 catches for 2,030 yards and 14 touchdowns.

Helms, Taylor and Searight were all rookies the Buccaneers had signed following last month's NFL draft. Williams is a vested veteran who previously played four seasons under Head Coach Bruce Arians in Arizona.

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